Why it's so important to get it right: because of fan letters like this one

I really struggled to get Girl, Stolen "right." My biggest fear was that someone who was blind would read the book and think how wrong it was.

But all that work paid off. I've gotten compliments from several folks who are blind, including today's email:

I just read “Girl Stolen” this morning, and, being I’m totally blind, I read it in the downloaded audio format from the National Library Service. I am writing because I want to say thank you for writing such an interesting and thoroughly researched book. At age 31, I was blinded in an auto accident, and could really relate to Cheyenne’s experiences because you truly understood and presented the emotional adjustment aspect of that process so well. I found myself smiling at the small, almost invisible, nuances of what daily life is like for somebody who can’t see, yet strives to live life to the fullest in a sighted world. My accident occurred 18 years ago, but it seems like it was only yesterday and the adjustment memories are some I think I’ll keep with me for the rest of my life. However, like Cheyenne, I long ago worked through to the acceptance phase of the adjustment process, but I will forever keep a kindling of hope in my heart that one day that miracle of sight restoration may occur.

Additionally, I also commend you on your presentation of the hospitalization and care of burn patients. I found myself nodding my head in agreement several times when you described Griffin’s injuries and the emotional scars that accompanied this. I learned much of this when I did my clinical psychology practicum at Shriners’ Burns Hospital in Galveston. Oh, how the patients loathed and feared the tub room!

This was my first experience with one of your books, but I am about to seek out more. I just wanted to share the appreciation and thoughts of your newest fan.




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I always worry when I write about someone who has experienced something I haven't and can only imagine.